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TENDER CO.

Tender Boomerang Prussian Blue Dye Jacket

€370,00

TENDER CO.

Tender Boomerang Prussian Blue Dye Jacket

€370,00

The Boomerang Jacket is cut without a shoulder seam. Usually this requires a straight horizontal shoulder, like a kimono, but to give a more comfortable fit this pattern is sloped over the shoulder. This sets the front and back parts of the shirt at an angle to each other, making a large boomerang-shaped panel. This also means that the grain of the fabric is pushed onto the bias down the body. Cutting this way makes the Boomerang Jacket slightly stretchy with a very satisfying bounce to the pockets.

This Tender jacket has been dyed with Prussian blue. Prussian blue pigment was discovered in around 1704 in Berlin, by the chemist Johann Jacob Diesbach. Prior to this, blues obtained from woad and indigo were susceptible to fading in bright light, and were unstable as pigments, so could not be used reliably for painting or printing. Prussian blue is derived from an iron salt, and gives an intense, slightly red-caste blue. In 1842, Sir John Herschel invented the cyanotype process, whereby Prussian blue pigment is fixed photographically by exposure to sun light through a negative. This technique was originally used by engineers as a way of accurately reproducing finely detailed technical drawings (‘blue-prints’) but was also adopted as a quicker printing process for photographs, as it did not require a darkroom. Many early postcards and family portraits were printed as cyanotypes.

Tender jackets are sewn by a husband and wife team of two, in their own small factory in the Midlands. One of the reasons that Tender’s clothes have their own special feel is the selection of machines used. Even lightweight shirts are produced on heavy machines designed for workwear and industrial purposes. By retooling and adjusting to allow for the fabric weight, garments come out with uniquely twisted or puckered seams. Longer stitch patterns give a feeling of practicality, but also avoid damaging the fabrics with unnecessary punctures and allow slight flexibility in the seams, helping the clothes to mould and form even better to the wearer’s body over time.

SPECIFICATIONS:

  • Cut from ecru cotton warp/natural linen weft twill woven in England to be laminated into car roofs
  • Prussian blue dyed
  • Square pockets with riveted corners
  • Fronts and backs are cut in one boomerang-shaped panel, angled over the shoulder
  • Body panels are thrown slightly onto the bias, giving them some bounce and stretch
  • Pleated false cuffs
  • Deeply curved bound hems
  • Real Natural olive wood buttons
  • 100% cotton thread
  • Made in England